Absence

A seed dropped by chance
inside a high-walled garden
became a tree
with impossibly deep roots
whose absence left a crater.





This poem was created for the Weekly Scribblings prompt at Poets and Storytellers United, Trees.


48 comments:

  1. "Bloom where you're planted," as they say!

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  2. There is no space more empty than where the Giant Oak once stood. We used to climb it as children. Long after we were gone, it was gone as well; remaining only in memory. We were cratered. Thanks for the vision.

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  3. A graphic illustration of 'from little things big things grow'.

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  4. I love the way you crammed the life cycle of a tree into this little seed of a poem, Rommy. The high-walled garden reminds me of the Oscar Wilde story about the selfish giant, and the crater left by roots reminds me of the hole after a tooth has been extracted – both painful.

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    1. I should revisit that story. It's been a bit.

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  5. How this prompt sent me back quite a few years to when as a youngster I spent a lot of time roaming the nearby woods and streams. Luckily in those days we had no electronic diversions so outdoor exploring was the game.

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  6. Beautiful image and beautiful words!

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  7. It is surprising how big a hole some leave when they depart, death or otherwise. I had to go on sick leave in March and couldn't come back to my classes for the rest of the semester. My substitute didn't suit my Entrepreneurship class, all but two dropped the class, they were on the Basket Ball team and that would not have been acceptable for their playing eligibility.
    Oh yes, I taught one more Summer class and retired in August.
    ..

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    1. Sounds like you touched many lives as a teacher.

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  8. Some of my best plants are "volunteers". Beautiful pic, and poem.

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    1. Volunteer plants can be rather enthusiastic growers

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  9. The image is amazing as is your poem .... I cry when we lose trees here in Bend, way too many in the name of 'progress.'

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    1. There were so many trees cut in my neighborhood for goodness knows what reason. It was really upsetting.

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  10. It takes just a tiny seed

    Happy Wednesday Rommy


    Much💜love

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  11. Oh, how sad to think it's gone. I always meant to stop nearby to take a picture of a gorgeous birch in autumn colors, but too late. It was cut down this past year. I hope their house is too sunny and hot!

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    1. I've found myself making similar wishes after some gorgeous older trees were cut down in my neighborhood.

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  12. Beautiful little poem. The last line the heart of poignancy.

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  13. I am happy for every new tree I see. So many are gone.

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    1. There is something heartening about seeing a spindly young tree begin to come into its own.

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  14. You described the lifecycle of a tree in just a few words. These words could also be describing a close person as well.
    Both leave giant holes when they're gone.

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    1. That was exactly my intention. Good eye. :)

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  15. Sigh. That crater never gets smaller, but... we can grow other things in there. No other tree will ever replace the first, the whatever else we grow can learn about the gone tree, keep it leaving through remembrance.

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    1. I've no doubt there will be lovely things still. The memories themselves are good food for beauty.

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  16. A brief summary of a giant loss. How I wish trees kept diaries. I always wonder at what they see in their lifetime.

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    1. Wouldn't that be something! I'd love to read a tree's diary.

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  17. Happy Easter

    (✿◠‿◠)

    much love...

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  18. The wonder of big things growing from just a seed. This is well executed tanka, Rommy.

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  19. A crater is an appropriate marker. There are invisible craters where loved ones used to be.

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    1. There are, and it's all too easy to trip over them.

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  20. from small acorns mighty oaks rose. it comes to mind. :)
    i do not understand why the tree was uprooted. perhaps it wasn't planned. but unplanned trees can be beautiful too.
    thanks for the song choice.

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  21. Some seeds do leave a huge crater when they are gone. Such a strong write.

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  22. Sometimes, things done by chance leaves a greater impact. Impactful poetry.

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    1. It never fails to surprise me how some very chance things in my life ended up having the most profound impact.

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  23. Absence leaving a "crater" despite the initial smallness -- I resonate with this.

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  24. Such a beautiful image and I Love your words Rommy! Big Hugs!

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