How I Learned About the Verdict

Just before he entered
into my house,
he talked about a killer
in the same tones
people talk about a sunny day.

In my house,
I saw the quick double take
when he saw I didn’t match
my not-all-that-new last name.

In my house,
I tried not to look at
the logo on his hat
(which my husband told me later
was the first hint).

In my house,
I made sure to craft the cadence of my voice,
not too formal, nor too casual,
because I can't really shapeshift.

In my house,
the visit was quick.
I tried to tell myself 
I was imagining things.
(My husband said I wasn’t.)

In my house,
I turned away 
from well-intentioned statements
I was too tired to deal with.

In my house,
I agreed with my husband,
some things could wait for another day
and said a quiet thank you
to the locks on the door.




Liner Notes for This Groove: This poem is linked to Poets and Storytellers United's Friday Writings #3 prompt, A Different Interpretation

30 comments:

  1. "I tried not to look at
    the logo on his hat"

    yep, i think i know what that means... it's like talking to bags of sand

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    1. The funny part (days and days later) is that to me it would seem like a poor business idea to advertise any controversial hot take, by words and clothing choice, when going to a potential customer's home. Not that I want said person's business to close, but I definitely feel more comfortable doing other things with my money.

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  2. Since the locks seem so very important, it makes me wonder what the logo on his hat was. Seriously serious write!

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    1. I left it vague because in some ways the detail matters less than the fact that the person felt it was business appropriate to deal with potential customers.

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  3. And our platforms are like having guests in our living room. Some, who add nothing and cross lines of credibility and decency are not invited.

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    1. Yes, I definitely think of my social media spaces as my parlor, and I am tired of people who barge in uninvited or who feel its fine to be rude.

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  4. An intriguing read ... you used one of my favorite words "shapeshifter" which made it even better!!!!

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    1. Shapeshifter is one of my favorite words too. LOL, that's why I keep finding myself writing stories about them.

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  5. Things strange and unimaginable sometimes go on in our houses. This seems to be one of those time. I echo some others: unsettling.

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    1. I am both pleased and a little horrified that I was able to get that feeling across just as I felt it.

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  6. This leaves us wanting to kow the rest of the story...and feeling a bit uneasy as well!

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    1. There really isn't too much more to this. Though I wonder... it might kick start a story idea or two. At least a scene in a story.

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  7. Replies
    1. I can only imagine the horror and heartbreak of those situations.

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  8. I'm mulling over your poem, Rommy. I think doors protect and help in keeping out all that doesn't serve us. Thought-provoking poem, for sure.

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    1. Thank you, Khaya. A good door definitely does make for a good ally at times.

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  9. There is such an unsettling and uneasy feel to the poem. I wonder what was the visit for and i am also intrigued by the title.

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    1. I did dither back and forth about how clear to be, but I think the ambiguity helps with the unsettled feeling.

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  10. Like others above, I also feel the unsettling feelings crawling all around my skull. But not just that, there is also outrage, frustration, and a hot but controlled rage oozing out of every stanza. The presence feels like a violation. Thank goodness for block buttons, for lack doors, and for the boundaries are are still able to set.

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    1. LOL, an appropriate alternate title could have been The Importance of Boundaries. And yes, there is a strong thread of controlled rage I was hoping would come across.

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  11. There comes a time when one becomes alarmed about another's, generally of the opposite sex, nearness and the two are alone but sometimes there are various others too. I'm glad your writer escaped with no bodily harm but there will be a memory scar that lasts a long time. I am dreadfully afraid of being alone with a woman taller than me, in an elevator for sure. I get off the next stop when one comes in. Just Saturday I was joined on the sidewalk by one, I was thinking about ducking into a store, like a black cat, don't be in her path but escape. Luckily she went into the parking lot, smiling at me first. At work? When I was a factory worker dropped-out 18-year old promoted to be over an assembly line setup man having 16 lady operators. I swear that every day their first project was to see who could make me blush first. That was many, many years ago.
    ..

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    1. Its interesting to analyze the types of social interactions that make us uncomfortable. We definitely learn more about ourselves in the process.

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  12. I don't really care of a person's beliefs and I agree with you regarding businesses espousing a point of view. For instance, if the business displays a political view, why alienate at least half your customers?
    A lock does provide peace but sometimes only temporarily (unfortunately)

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    1. In a different time, my husband and I might have had a good laugh about what passes for professionalism these days and made jokes about him doing well for himself if he's letting it all out there like this. Because you are right, either way will cost you business. But several things taken all together, including the undeniable tension of the times we live in made this an extremely awkward and yes unsettling experience.

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  13. Ugh, get out! Glad you got this fine piece of writing out of the experience. I mean, there's that, not a small thing. :)

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    1. Thanks, Marian! Writing things like this out is very therapeutic and if it comes out half-decent, I consider it a huge win!

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